A Digital Identity - An Algorithm For The Soul

Website Privacy Standards Infographic

visualoop:

Via

world-shaker:

First you’ll need to copy the URL for your profile. Using my Twitter profile as an example, the link would look like this: https://twitter.com/c0z. Once you have the link you’ll need open Google’s Content Removal page — you may need to log in to Google services again when you get there. Click the Create new removal request button and paste the link. On the next page that loads, you’ll be able to remove cached content associated with the page you’re having removed. In order for Google to allow this, you’ll need to provide a piece of information that appears on the cached version but not the live version.

Outstanding reference.

infoneer-pulse:

Spies Want to Mine Your Tweets for Signs of the Next Tsunami

The intelligence community has seen the future, and the future is Google Trends. Actually, more like a highly sophisticated version of Google Trends, with Twitter and YouTube thrown in for good measure.
Iarpa, the blue-sky research arm of the intelligence community, recently announced a new program that aims to monitor, collect and analyze publicly available data to predict future events. The Open Source Indicator Program would be so sensitive to changes in the zeitgeist that it could “beat the news,” anticipating “political crises, disease outbreaks, economic instability, resource shortages and natural disasters” — to name a few.

» via Wired

infoneer-pulse:

Spies Want to Mine Your Tweets for Signs of the Next Tsunami

The intelligence community has seen the future, and the future is Google Trends. Actually, more like a highly sophisticated version of Google Trends, with Twitter and YouTube thrown in for good measure.

Iarpa, the blue-sky research arm of the intelligence community, recently announced a new program that aims to monitor, collect and analyze publicly available data to predict future events. The Open Source Indicator Program would be so sensitive to changes in the zeitgeist that it could “beat the news,” anticipating “political crises, disease outbreaks, economic instability, resource shortages and natural disasters” — to name a few.

» via Wired

AGAIN!

infoneer-pulse:

Facebook users’ personal information could have been accidentally leaked to third parties, in particular advertisers, over the past few years, according to Symantec Corp’s official web blog.

Third-parties would have had access to personal information such as profiles, photographs and chat, and could have had the ability to post messages, Symantec’s web blog said.

» via Yahoo! News

Geo-localization. Can I be invisible, sometime…?

Geo-localization. Can I be invisible, sometime…?

US spy operation that manipulates social media

kateoplis:

danielholter:

newsflick:

The US military is developing software that will let it secretly manipulate social media using fake online personas designed to influence internet conversations and spread pro-American propaganda.

A Californian corporation has been awarded a contract with the US Central Command (Centcom) to develop what is described as an “online persona management service” that will allow one serviceman or woman to control up to 10 separate identities at once.

The contract stipulates each persona must have a convincing background, history and supporting details, and that up to 50 controllers must be able to operate false identities from their workstations “without fear of being discovered by sophisticated adversaries”.

The project has been likened by web experts to China’s attempts to control and restrict free speech on the internet.

Read Full Article 

KInda surprised it took this long.

Falling behind China in almost every single category.

They "trust me". Dumb fucks
Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook

This is a supposed  comment to friend at the beginning of the Facebook adventure. Serious or just humour, it does highlight the aggressive privacy - data collecting “culture” of Facebook. Your - Our Information is their business & we hand it over - every detail - for free! 
infoneer-pulse:

Most Internet Users Willing to Pay for Privacy

Focus on the top section first, which provides the age groups polled. As you go from oldest to youngest, privacy concern lessens. Younger Americans are more willing to grant advertisers information about their interests than older Americans. One of two things is going on here. Either younger Americans are more comfortable with less Internet privacy or the desire for secrecy grows as people age. While either theory could hold in theory, the former probably makes more sense. The younger the age group, the more of their formative years were spent in the Internet age, which probably makes younger Americans more comfortable having their privacy compromised by online advertisers.
What’s stranger, however, is the second part of the chart above — the income distribution. Astonishingly, the wealthier the respondent, the less willing they are to pay for their privacy. In other words, there’s an inverse relationship between those who are willing to pay for privacy and those who can more easily afford to do so.

» via The Atlantic

infoneer-pulse:

Most Internet Users Willing to Pay for Privacy

Focus on the top section first, which provides the age groups polled. As you go from oldest to youngest, privacy concern lessens. Younger Americans are more willing to grant advertisers information about their interests than older Americans. One of two things is going on here. Either younger Americans are more comfortable with less Internet privacy or the desire for secrecy grows as people age. While either theory could hold in theory, the former probably makes more sense. The younger the age group, the more of their formative years were spent in the Internet age, which probably makes younger Americans more comfortable having their privacy compromised by online advertisers.

What’s stranger, however, is the second part of the chart above — the income distribution. Astonishingly, the wealthier the respondent, the less willing they are to pay for their privacy. In other words, there’s an inverse relationship between those who are willing to pay for privacy and those who can more easily afford to do so.

» via The Atlantic

Movie: ENEMY OF THE STATE (1998)

Does this all sound familiar to you …?